4 Best CPU for Encoding – Complete Guide

This guide will let you know about the Best CPU for Encoding along with its features and many more. So don’t miss anything and keep reading to know more.

Encoders are a crucial part of many gamers’ rigs. Whether you’re a Twitch streamer, YouTuber, or amateur movie editor, your CPU is going to be one of the most important parts of your computer. The average gamer probably won’t notice much difference between an i7 and an i5 for gaming purposes, but the encoding is a different story. If you’ve ever tried to stream on YouTube with nothing more than integrated graphics, then it’s obvious that your processor needs some power behind it. 

In this post, we’ll go over what makes a good encoder chip as well as which CPUs are the best in each price range. We’ll also talk about how they compare to GPUs so that even if you don’t plan on encoding with your rig, you’ll still be able to make an informed choice when buying the Best CPU for Encoding.

A Quick Look At Encoding Algorithms For Best CPU for Encoding

The first algorithm that ever existed (and still exists) is called MPEG-2. It was originally standardized in 1994 by the Motion Picture Expert Group(MPEG). MPEG-2 uses interframe compression which means it analyzes whole frames rather than just individual images.

This algorithm is simple and typically produces very good quality encodes, but it isn’t as efficient as other algorithms which can mean higher file sizes after encoding. The main use for MPEG-2 is to encode TV shows onto DVDs or Blu-rays.

The next big algorithm was AVC/H.264 which was developed by the Joint Collaborative Team on Video Coding (JCT-VC). It was standardized in 2003 and uses intraframe compression which means it analyzes individual images rather than whole frames.

This algorithm is more efficient than MPEG-2 but requires a much higher bitrate to produce similar quality results. The main use for AVC/H.264 is streaming videos on the web and making Blu-ray backups.

The last algorithm we’ll talk about today is HEVC/H.265 which was standardized in 2013 by the Joint Collaborative Team on Video Coding (JCT-VC). It’s a successor to AVC/H.264 and uses intraframe compression just like its predecessor.

It is said to be rough twice as efficient as AVC/H.264 at the same subjective quality, but it isn’t compatible with most devices that only support AVC/H.264 (for example, DVDs playback fine on most players, but don’t work on an iPhone). For now, HEVC/H.265 is mainly used for streaming and Blu-ray backups, but it will become more common as the codec becomes supported by more devices.

The Main Categories of Encoding CPUs For Best CPU for Encoding

CPUs that are primarily used for encoding can be divided into two main categories: High Frequency and Low Power.

High-Frequency CPUs

The main advantage of high-frequency CPUs is that they produce much faster results than their low-power counterparts; the downside is that they typically consume more power as a result.

CPUs in this category have a higher turbo clock which means they can overclock themselves, so if your CPU is rated for 4GHz but doesn’t always run at that speed, you can make it do so with overclocking (which is often as simple as increasing the multiplier). Except for Broadwell CPUs, there are no low-power high-frequency CPUs on the market.

Low Power CPUs

The main advantage of low-power CPUs is that they consume significantly less power than their high-frequency counterparts; the downside is that they are slower when encoding. CPU core counts are one of the best indicators of low power CPUs because high-frequency CPUs are often limited to 4 cores, but low-power CPUs can have up to 8 cores. The only major disadvantage of additional cores in a CPU is that you can’t use all of them at the same time (so you’ll get worse performance in certain situations).

Low Power vs High-Frequency CPUs: A Detailed Look

Now that we know the difference between high-frequency and low-power CPUs, we can compare them to find which is best in each price range. Keep in mind that this comparison is based purely on encoding performance and doesn’t take power consumption or CPU core counts into account.

Low-power CPUs can be much faster than high-frequency models in some cases, but the opposite is also true. Low-power CPUs do consume less power, but not enough to be significant in most cases (and the real difference only becomes clear when encoding for a long time).

Top 4 Best CPU for Encoding

Preview
AMD Ryzen 5 5600X 6-core, 12-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Stealth Cooler
AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 12-core, 24-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor
Intel Core i9-10850K Desktop Processor 10 Cores up to 5.2 GHz Unlocked LGA1200 (Intel 400 Series...
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 8-Core, 16-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Prism LED Cooler
Title
AMD Ryzen 5 5600X 6-core, 12-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Stealth Cooler
AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 12-core, 24-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor
Intel Core i9-10850K Desktop Processor 10 Cores up to 5.2 GHz Unlocked LGA1200 (Intel 400 Series...
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 8-Core, 16-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Prism LED Cooler
Price
$299.00
$629.00
$409.99
$307.00
Status
-
Preview
AMD Ryzen 5 5600X 6-core, 12-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Stealth Cooler
Title
AMD Ryzen 5 5600X 6-core, 12-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Stealth Cooler
Price
$299.00
Status
Details
Preview
AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 12-core, 24-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor
Title
AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 12-core, 24-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor
Price
$629.00
Status
-
Details
Preview
Intel Core i9-10850K Desktop Processor 10 Cores up to 5.2 GHz Unlocked LGA1200 (Intel 400 Series...
Title
Intel Core i9-10850K Desktop Processor 10 Cores up to 5.2 GHz Unlocked LGA1200 (Intel 400 Series...
Price
$409.99
Status
Details
Preview
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 8-Core, 16-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Prism LED Cooler
Title
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 8-Core, 16-Thread Unlocked Desktop Processor with Wraith Prism LED Cooler
Price
$307.00
Status
Details

1. AMD Ryzen 5 5600X – Best CPU for Encoding

The AMD Ryzen 5 5600X 6-core CPU is one of the latest offerings from AMD and is the Best CPU for Encoding. The new processor comes with a base clock speed of 3.6 GHz, which can be boosted up to 4.2 GHz using Precision Boost 2 technology. It has six cores and 12 threads, so it’s perfect for any basic tasks or multimedia applications that are being used by individuals or businesses alike. This chip also features an unlocked multiplier, meaning overclocking is possible without voiding your warranty.

With 6 cores, 12 threads, and a 3.8GHz base clock speed, this processor will make any gaming rig sing! The price point is one of the best features of this processor – at USD 209 for an unlocked chip that can be overclocked to 4.2 GHz.

The AMD Ryzen 5 5600X is a powerful processor with six cores and 12 threads, clocked at a 3.6GHz base and 4.2GHz boost frequency. It’s also an unlocked part, meaning you can overclock it to your heart’s content! This chip has an integrated GPU as well – the Radeon RX Vega 11 – which has 11 compute units and is capable of driving up to 1.3 teraflops of performance. And if you want more than one, you don’t have to worry; there are two DIMM slots on offer here for dual-channel memory support.”

The new chip will be the successor to the popular AMD Ryzen 7 2700X and will be designed for gamers who want more cores and threads than Intel’s offerings. Although it won’t be as power-efficient as Intel processors, this chip should provide better performance at a lower price point.

The new chip features eight threads, boosts up to 4.2GHz in Turbo Mode, and has a 95W TDP that can be overclocked for better performance. You’ll also get 2MB of L2 cache per core for high-speed data access – perfect if you’re running demanding applications like video editing software or 3D rendering software.

This new processor has a base frequency of 3.6 GHz and can boost up to 4.2 GHz in single-core mode with an all-core frequency of up to 3.9GHz when overclocked! The AMD Ryzen 5 5600X 6-core is based on the 2nd Gen Zen+ architecture which includes improved performance for both multi-threaded workloads as well as single-threaded workloads.

The AMD Ryzen 5 5600X 6-Core Processor features a base clock speed of 3.6GHz and can be boosted up to 4.4GHz when needed. It also comes equipped with 16MB of L3 cache memory that allows the system to run smoothly without any lag time between applications or processes being opened on your computer. 

The Ryzen series of CPUs are specifically designed for high-performance gaming rigs that can handle more intense applications or games with ease. It features a six-core processor to provide increased processing power and faster speeds than some other systems on the market today, so you don’t have to worry about lagging behind your competition.

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2. AMD Ryzen 9 5900X – Best CPU for Encoding

AMD’s new Ryzen 9 5900X is the company’s most powerful workstation CPU, and it has a lot to offer due to which is the Best CPU for Encoding. This 12-core chip features an impressive base clock speed of 3.5 GHz, which can be boosted up to 4.6 GHz with Turbo Core technology. That means that this processor will outperform Intel’s fastest desktop processors in tasks like video editing, rendering video games, or other applications that are very compute-intensive.

 It has 16 cores and supports up to 3200MHz memory speeds, which help increase your productivity when working on intensive tasks. The CPU also features a quad-channel DDR4 controller with 64GB of maximum capacity for memory running at 2666MHz. With all these features, you can set this processor as the centerpiece of your workstation or gaming rig.

 The Ryzen 9 5900X processor is the top-of-the-line model that features a base clock speed at 3.5GHz and boosts speeds up to 4.4GHz when necessary, as well as 20MB of cache memory on board for better performance. Maybe this might be just what you are looking for if you are considering upgrading your CPU.

This CPU is designed for heavy workloads like video editing and 3D rendering, but it’s also well suited to gaming. With a base clock speed of 3.5GHz and boost speeds up to 4.7GHz, this processor can handle any task you throw at it! The 5900X supports 64 PCIe lanes so your GPU will be able to run at full capacity without bottlenecking performance in other areas of your system.

The Ryzen 9 5900X is the most powerful desktop processor AMD has ever made, and it’s also their first octa-core CPU for mainstream PCs. This processor will be able to run any application you can think of without slowing down or getting stuck, making it a perfect selection for those who need high performance in heavy workloads such as 3D rendering, video editing, and more.

The Ryzen 9 5900X is also the fastest AMD processor on the market today with a base frequency of 3.5GHz which increases up to 4.4GHz with boost technology! Whether you’re looking for better performance than Intel or competitive pricing against other AMD processors, the Ryzen 9000X is a great choice.

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3. Intel Core I9-10850K – Best CPU for Encoding

The Intel Core I9-10850K is a new high-performance product from Intel and is the Best CPU for Encoding. It features a base frequency of 4.3GHz and boosts the frequency of up to 5.0 GHz with an 8MB cache, which can be overclocked as well via Turbo Boost 2.0 for even more power! The I9-10850K also has the same number of cores as the previous generation but it now supports Hyper-Threading, so you get 16 threads at your disposal.

The new Intel Core I9-10850K is capable of running at a base clock speed of 3.6 GHz with a boost speed up to 4.3 GHz and is the Best CPU for Encoding. Not only that, but it includes 12 processing cores for those super intense tasks as well as an integrated graphics card from the 8th Generation Intel HD Graphics 630.

It has six cores and can process up to 10,850kHZ. This powerful CPU will allow you to multitask with ease, run programs without any lag or slow down, and easily switch between tasks. The Intel Core I9-10850K also comes with a cooler that keeps the CPU from overheating no matter how much you abuse it.

With this new CPU, you can look forward to up to 12 cores with 24 threads for unbelievable processing power that will be able to handle almost anything you throw at it. It is also unlocked so overclocking is possible and it comes with an integrated graphics card which means your desktop won’t need a separate GPU to run smoothly. Intel has always been known for its high-quality products and the Core I9-10850K does not disappoint.

The Intel Core I9-10850K will be able to keep up with the demands of the most demanding workloads while being able to run cool enough so you can put it on your laptop without worrying about overheating. This Best CPU for Encoding is perfect for gamers looking for higher frame rates on their favorite games, or video editors wanting to edit 4k videos without lag! If you’re not an extreme user but want something better than what you have now, this chip might be just right for you too.

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4. Ryzen 7 3700X – Best CPU for Encoding

The new AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 8-Core CPU is a powerhouse for any workstation and is the Best CPU for Encoding. With its high clock speeds and powerful integrated graphics, this processor will be the ideal choice for your next build. You can select from a range of compatible motherboards that have built-in WiFi to save on external components.

It is a top-of-the-line CPU that can handle any task thrown at it and does so while being power efficient. This is a perfect computer for gamers looking to play on ultra settings or professionals who need a powerful workstation to edit 4K videos. If you are considering upgrading your PC this year, definitely look into an AMD Ryzen Processor.

The AMD Ryzen 7 3700X is a powerful, 8-core CPU for gaming and content creation. It has the latest Zen 2 architecture with a 12nm production process to provide better performance than its predecessor. The processor also features 16MB of L3 cache, 4x 512KB of L2 cache per core; it supports up to 64GB of DDR4 memory (with overclocking) and can be installed on an AM4 socket motherboard.

For graphics rendering, the integrated GPU is only capable of around 1/6th that of Intel’s i7 9700K; however, this does not mean that you should give up on your dreams of building a workstation PC.

The Ryzen 3700X has a TDP of just 65W, so it’s energy-efficient too. The AMD Ryzen is a powerful, core CPU for gaming and content creation. It features the latest Zen architecture with a 12nm production process to provide better performance than its predecessor.

The processor also comes with 16MB of L33 cache; supports up to 64GB of DDR memory and can be installed on an AM socket motherboard. For graphics rendering, the integrated GPU is only capable of around one-sixth that of Intel’s i7700K; however, this does not mean that you should give up on your dreams of building a workstation PC.

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How to Choose Best CPU for Encoding

Choosing the best CPU for encoding is not an easy task. Many factors need to be taken into consideration such as processing power, number of cores, clock speed, and architecture. To make things more complicated, there are also different types of encoding software available that can affect the performance of your chosen CPU. 

We will first take a look at the CPU hierarchy, then explore encoding software options and finally conclude with an all-inclusive list of proven CPU models.

CPU Hierarchy For Best CPU for Encoding

Broadly speaking there are three types of CPUs: multicore desktop CPUs, multicore server CPUs, and single-core embedded CPUs. While the first two groups are designed for general-purpose computing, embedded CPUs are specifically created for running an OS and supporting applications in low power environments.

Desktop CPUs have the highest performance, typically starting at 4 cores / 8 threads with a clock speed around 3 GHz. Such processors will come with a high TDP (typically 95W) which means they require big cooling solutions. It is important to note that despite having a higher TDP, desktop CPUs can be throttled more aggressively as their thermal limits are far more tolerant.

These processors usually have more cache memory and advanced security features such as VT-d/VT-x which makes them a better choice for virtualization tasks such as encoding.

Server CPUs support up to 16 cores / 32 threads and a TDP of up to 150W. They also have more cache memory and can withstand higher temperatures. If you plan on encoding multiple streams, server CPUs are the way to go as they have increased multithreading capabilities that allow them to efficiently process multiple tasks simultaneously.

Embedded CPUs usually come with between 1-4 cores / 2-8 threads and a TDP of 35W or lower. The main difference between embedded CPUs and desktop/server CPUs is that the latter is designed for general computing, while the former is optimized exclusively for running an OS and driving applications in low-power environments. You should only consider using embedded CPUs if encoding will be done on a hardware NLE or a system that does not have a discrete GPU.

Things to Consider While Buying Best CPU for Encoding

To encode video, you need a powerful CPU that can perform mathematical calculations. If you buy an inexpensive processor without the fast-lane technology, then the encoding will take hours or days (depending on your PC) to complete. So let’s see what specifications should look for while purchasing the best CPU for encoding.

CPU Cores – Best CPU for Encoding

The CPU is one of the most important parts of a computer. It’s often referred to as the brain because it does all the “thinking” for your computer. The CPU has two main jobs. One, it executes instructions that are given to it by other programs on your computer, and second, it manages what information is stored in memory so that different programs can interact with each other without getting confused about who owns what data. A CPU core is just another word for a single unit of this processing power. Modern CPUs can have more than one core, and that’s what allows them to do so many things at once.

CPU Cache

A CPU cache is a fast but small memory subsystem on the microprocessor. It stores copies of data from frequently used main memory locations to minimize the time for future requests. The higher the level of a processor’s cache, the faster it can access information. However, accessing data in a lower level cache takes longer than reading from or writing to main memory because additional circuitry is involved and there are more levels of caching between the processor and its destination.

Cache levels are often measured in the number of cache sets, which is equivalent to associativity. The most common type of cache today for modern microprocessors is the level-one cache, which is a small memory cache. There are other types of caches in addition to this including level-two cache and level three cache and more.

Cache levels can be compared to different types of buckets holding water where the lowest level would have a very wide bucket which would be the main memory. The next level would have smaller buckets and so on until you reach a small bucket which is located at the top of your water tower.

Cache levels work by comparing the tag for each cache entry to determine if there is a match and then move up or down the cache hierarchy. If a match is found at the top level, it is known as a hit and if not then a miss occurs which will require a fetch from the main memory. The goal of having multiple cache levels is to improve performance by taking advantage of the locality principle which states that data being accessed is often accessed again in the near future. This principle helps reduce the time needed to access data that is located in a lower level of cache and can have a big impact on performance.

Intel i7 vs AMD Ryzen

Both Intel and AMD have their pros and cons. The price of an Intel processor is higher whereas the performance of an AMD processor is lower than that of an Intel processor. So it all depends on your budget. If you want to encode the videos on a tight budget then AMD processors will be better for you. But if you have a higher budget and can afford an Intel i7 processor, then it will be better than any other CPU.

CPU Speed – Best CPU for Encoding

A CPU (Central Processing Unit) is the brain of a computer. It’s like the heart, and it does all of the thinking for your computing device. The speed at which this “brain” operates can be measured in hertz or gigahertz; these are two names used to measure how fast a processor goes under load. A more powerful CPU will go faster than one with less power, but they both have their place in today’s digital world.

Best CPU for Encoding – Conclusion

The Intel Core i9-10850K is the great and best CPU for encoding, but it’s not the best if you want to use your computer as a workhorse. This processor will be able to handle any video editing or rendering task with ease and its six cores mean that this chip can multitask better than most others on the market today.

If other tasks are running in addition to encoding, however, then those processes may take up more of the processing power from the 10850K which means that some frames could render slower as a result. In general, though, we recommend this as one of our top choices if you’re looking for an excellent encoder at quite an affordable price point.

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